The Broad Museum and Toddlers

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I’ve been wanting to visit the Broad Museum for some time now.  It’s not the most convenient of museums to go to, but it’s new, free, and has the Infinity Mirrored Room (which everyone knows is perfect for a selfie).  While  I loved the Broad, I’m going to suggest that if you are going to bring an active toddler with you…just DON’T!

First of all, you have to reserve tickets to go to the museum for a set time, and everyone knows toddlers will be cranky for any event that you decide to plan at a specific time.  We hopped online the day tickets became available a month before our visit and surprise surprise, all the good times had sold out by the time our page refreshed.  So we were left with a 4pm time slot.  For those of you who don’t know, 4pm is before dinner and basically wild rumpus time.  “But surely the amazing architecture and impressive collection will intrigue your toddler,” you may be saying to yourself.

Toddlers don’t give a crap about cool architecture or artwork.  In fact they are likely to be scared by creepy paintings and traumatized by violent and/or sexual images.  Which they were.  Roro not so much, but her 3 year old buddy was definitely affected by the images in the collection.  While I’m not a fan of sheltering your child, I will say to come prepared to explain A LOT of things.  While one toddler was being emotionally traumatized, the other (Roro) was really digging the cement floor.  She dug it so much, that she decided to plop herself face down on the floor in the middle of each gallery room and pretend to sleep.  Yes, my friends, she was so into the art she wanted to snooze.  When I tried to pick her up, she turned floppy (parents of toddlers, you know what I’m talking about).  What came next was lots of mom sweating and avoiding eye contact with other museum goers.

Toddlers also don’t care about rules.  Mine kept trying to touch sculptures and stand on their pedestals.  She also doesn’t follow social norms and will just cozy up to strangers browsing on their phones in the middle of the museum.  If said stranger ignores her, she will try to be really cute and giggle.  This is more embarrassing for me than her, as she has no idea she’s being rejected, but I am fully aware that the hipster before her has no interest in children.

So, what was the best part, you ask? OUTSIDE. There was a green lawn outside of the museum and all the kids were just running around.  Roro liked that.

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I’d LOVE to go back to the Broad to contemplate the works and themes of the gallery, but I’m gonna wait til I have a babysitter next time.

P.S. Infinity Mirrored Room selfie was foiled by toddler fears of small dark rooms.

The Broad

221 S. Grand Avenue

Los Angeles, CA 90012

The Smell of Grubby Kids

I’m a grass is always greener kind of gal.  When I was in the classroom, I was SO ready to retire.  The politics, the behavior issues, the feeling that you were never doing enough was sometimes too much.  After 9 years of it, I was ready for a hiatus.  I’ve been out of the classroom for 2.5 years now, and I’ve started to miss it a bit. I miss interacting with a classroom full of inquisitive minds.  I miss teaching reading and writing and doing read alouds that lead to honest and interesting discussions.  I miss planning lessons and making templates on Word while stealing clip art from the web.

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Why the sudden nostalgia?  Today we were walking past our neighborhood school and I heard all the kids playing and yelling and having fun.  But then I caught a whiff.  If you’re a teacher you know what I’m talking about.  It’s a mixture of laundry detergent, boogers, kid sweat, soap, and innocence.  The sense of smell is one of the senses most powerfully connected to memories.  I was taken back to all the classrooms I’d ever taught in, filled with amazing little children, and I forgot about all the school drama and just missed it.